Satsang with Swami Dhyan Giten in Stockholm: The Way to Truth and Enlightenment

  Swami Dhyan Giten

SATSANG

with

 

During the Satsang with Giten in Stockholm on Thursday, November, 7, Giten recapitulated the first three steps of Vedanta’s 7 steps to enlightenment. Giten also talked about Buddha’s words on commitment on the way to truth and enlightenment, and recommended a meditation for the coming week. 
The first three steps of Vedanta’s seven steps to enlightenment is the masculine phase. It is the phase of doing, effort, commitment and will.
The first three steps are:
1. The oceanic feeling, heart, body,
feeling God is everywhere in human
beings, animals, flowers, stones and nature
2. Thinking, contemplation, meditation, training
the mind to be focused. Only a focused mind can
disappear.
 3. Non-attachment, desirelessness, becoming
aware about desires and becoming the inner witness. 
Giten opened this Satsang with the questions to the participants about what their main desire and main attachment in life that creates a fear to trust the abundance of life and creates a separation from life. Giten also asked the participants how they related to meditation, and how much they had a relationship to meditation as a committed, regular and heartful practice. 
One participant commented that his main desire and attachment was survival both in relation to practical things and in relation to other people, which created a separation from life. He also said that meditation became a “doing” for him, rather than a non-doing. 
Giten commented that meditation is not really something you can “do”. Meditation is not about achieving results, it is not about getting anywhere. In fact, all desires and ambitions create a hindrance to meditation. 
Another participant said that he felt that he was in a “yes”-phase in life when much was happening on the inside, but that it brought up a desire and an attachment that the yes-flow would not disappear, and create a feeling that nothing was happening. He also said that his main desire was a patience for his spiritual growth. 
Giten commented that this desire is, in fact, very good for his spiritual growth as patience is needed in the spiritual growth. Giten said that patience, meditation, wisdom and silence are aspects of the same phenomenon.
Giten continued to talk about Buddha’s words on commitment on the way to truth and enlightenment. 
Buddha
– The Way to Truth and Enlightenment
– Some walk on the path to enlightenment and are faint hearted, some go half way and some come home victorious. Enlightenment is to come home.
– Walk steadily on your way to enlightenment
– Walk with resolve and courage
– Be fearless in whatever situation you may be
– Destroy every evil influence that you may come across
– In this way, you shall reach the goal 
“There are many types of people. A few are cowards, who never walk the way to truth and enlightenment. A few come back when difficulties start to arise on the way. A few go the way half-heartedly, and then return back again. There are only a few that go into the battle of enlightenment, and who come back home. You have to be ready, otherwise you will miss the goal. Coming home is Samadhi, enlightenment, and that is what Buddha’s eightfold path to truth and enlightenment is about.” 
– Swami Dhyan Giten
Giten closed his talk with giving a meditation called Nirodha, which focuses on the gaps, the silence, the emptiness, that occurs between two thoughts.
Nirodha
– A Glimpse of Being,
a Glimpse of Samadhi
 
“I have been talking with students in my individual therapy- and meditation program’s about the enlightened Indian Master psychologist Patanjali and his 8 steps to enlightenment. I have found a meditation, which Patanjali calls Nirodha. Nirodha is a very simple and significant meditation, which gives me deep insight into my being, deep insights into samadhi. 
Nirodha is the gaps, the silence, the emptiness, that occurs between two thoughts. One thought comes, it goes again, another thought comes, but between these two thoughts there are a very subtle gap, a very subtle interval. Between two thoughts, there are a moment of silence, when you are thoughtless. These gaps is the door into insights into our inner being. We all experience these glimpses of being, but these glimpses are very small so unless we are aware, we will miss them. 
Do not pay attention to the thoughts, focus on the gaps. Ordinarily we focus on the thoughts, but we do not focus on the gaps between the thoughts. 
These gaps appears first as small glimpses, then larger gaps, until one day thoughts disappears – and you are in a deep silence.
There is really no need for any other meditation, there is no need to do anything else, if you can just sit silently and go on watching the gaps. 
These glimpses gives us an insight into who we really are beyond our ideas, thoughts and conditioning, which will make your false identity fall away by itself. 
In these gaps, in this silence, you are in the same state as one who has attained samadhi, who has attained enlightenment. The only difference is that our state is a momentary glimpse. These glimpses gives us the first glimpse of samadhi, the first glimpse of enlightenment.”
– Swami Dhyan Giten
The lecture was followed by 30 minutes of Satsang with Giten in silence and meditation, where a deep silence and oneness emerged in the group. It felt like a modern mystery school of love and truth was emerging, which made Giten’s heart dance with joy. 
During the winter 2013, there is be an opportunity for open Satsang with Giten during Thursday evenings in Stockholm. Satsang with Giten will also continue during the spring 2014 in Stockholm.
Read more about open Satsang with Giten during the autumn 2013 on Facebook:
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